Inalienable rights

by on July 7, 2014


When I visited Hiroshima and the Peace museum there, I was blown away by the forgiveness exhibited by the Japanese people. Walking around that museum was one of the most moving experiences of my life. We called it the “cry museum”. There’s something wrong with you if you can walk through that museum without shedding a tear. The museum is a memorial for the atomic bomb victims and it shows the price of war in a very up-close and uncomfortable way.

Today I stumbled on this TED talk by George Takei on Why I love a country that once betrayed me:

Once again, I found myself blown away by the unbelievable amount of forgiveness by the Japanese people.

I was also reminded of how much I appreciate the ideals on which the United States was founded — the idea that all people are created equal. The idea that all people have an inalienable right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

Today there are countless examples of inequality in our country. It’s so easy to be discouraged. Takei’s story is certainly a solemn reminder of how easily we can slip away from these founding principles. Bono likes to talk about the “blind spots of our age”. We look back on the injustice we displayed to Japanese Americans with horror and disgrace. What are the things we’re accepting today that history will judge us for?

Those inalienable right are still worth defending.

The security hole I found on Amazon.com

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by Josh Fraser on February 25, 2013


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